Every new website is an opportunity to redefine how your brand is perceived, discovered and recalled by your audience. If your business has a digital dependency for marketing, lead generation or brand awareness, a website typically runs its course every three to four years (or even lesser), and needs an upgrade or revamp. With disruptive ideas in design philosophy, technology and tools conceived every hour – staying ahead of the game, really demands that you stay ahead of the trend.

Being objectively creative

 

More often than not, teams simply decide they want a new website – ‘because the old one isn’t interesting anymore’.

 

However, the success of a website depends entirely on how thought through its objectives are. The need for (and the expected benefit from) a new site must be logically ascertained, way before deciding that it is a good ‘solution’. Your business might need to hike up sales conversions – a new website could help this happen; you might want to reposition your brand as a thought leader – a new website might be a solution; or you might want to improve engagement with a known audience – a new website could give you a platform. This way, a good site could help you achieve a variety of business objectives, if only you know what they are – clearly, to begin with.

An e-commerce website, for example, could doubtlessly benefit from a regular revamp – as newer and more exciting technologies improve the website performance. Better performance & regularly integrating user feedback to enhance user experiences will lead to better sales & conversions. In contrast, a simple informative site that does its job well, might not need an additional investment into a website for several years (until a point when newer benefits are clearly surmised).

It is important that you break down your objectives into the following buckets:

  • Primary: An absolute must have – which will imapct your business bottom line
  • Secondary: Would be good to have & will add value
  • Tertiary: Aesthetic choices & trend setting features

Stakeholder groups

Getting a pulse of your audience

Once the objectives are chalked out, the next step would be to understand the people that would interact with your website – your stakeholders. They could include your existing customers, potential customers, employees, potential hires, media, industry audiences, analysts etc. Your stakeholders could also be other businesses and partner organizations. While on one hand, the website is a representation of your brand to the digital world, on the other, it is a platform for your audiences to interact with you. So, it is imperative that it is constructed with an appealing and convenient interface for the user.

Leading the trend

Once we understand who we are targeting, and to what end-effect, we are ready to begin creating your website. A good site –

  • Accurately represents your culture, brand persona and competitive strengths
  • Targets and appeals to the right audiences, with crisp (yet adequate) messaging and a simple experience.
  • Helps a user seamlessly discover and navigate information, and stay engaged

Things change fast in the digital world. Creating a website that stands the test of time is as rewarding, as it is challenging. We could help you overcome this challenge, and build a great new website.

Connect with us!

 

Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

two + two =